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Assessment of Some Heavy Metals Among Petrol Station Attendants in Ekpoma and Its Environs
Current Issue
Volume 3, 2018
Issue 1 (January)
Pages: 8-12   |   Vol. 3, No. 1, January 2018   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 36   Since Jan. 15, 2018 Views: 882   Since Jan. 15, 2018
Authors
[1]
Airhomwanbor O. Kingsley, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria.
[2]
Dic-Ijiewere O. Ebenezer, Department of Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria.
[3]
Idehen I. Charles, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria.
[4]
Eidangbe A. Peace, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria.
[5]
Ehimare R. Isibor, Department of Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria.
[6]
Uwuigbe Matthew, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria.
[7]
Ohue, E. M., Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria.
Abstract
Premium motor spirit (PMS), otherwise known as gasoline, is a volatile liquid that evaporates if left exposed to constitute ubiquitous chemical pollutants in the immediate environment. This study was carried out to assess the levels of heavy metals of petrol station attendants in Ekpoma and its environs. A total of 100 individuals (males and females) comprising of 60 apparently healthy petrol station attendants and control group consisting of 40 apparently healthy individuals were used for this study. Serum levels of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) were determined using standard methods. The mean±SD values of subjects’ Fe (109.06±16.08 µg/dl), Zn (90.22±16.08 µg/dl), Cu (120.77±24.12 µg/dl) and Pb (1.27±0.16 µg/dl) and mean±SD values of controls’ Fe (109.45±10.52 µg/dl), Zn (92.53±7.60 µg/dl), Cu (117.46±11.14 µg/dl) and Pb (0.33±0.09 µg/dl) were compared. The analysis showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in the serum level of lead of petrol station attendants when compared with controls. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the level of iron, zinc and copper of petrol station attendants when compared with controls. The results generated in this study have shown that petrol station attendants in the study area may be prone to lead toxicity.
Keywords
Petrol, Attendants, Lead, Heavy, Metal
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