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Photo-Conversion and Photo-Catalytic Efficiency of Hydrothermally Treated Anatase-TiO2 Films and Nanoparticles
Current Issue
Volume 2, 2015
Issue 1 (February)
Pages: 1-8   |   Vol. 2, No. 1, February 2015   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 32   Since Aug. 28, 2015 Views: 1719   Since Aug. 28, 2015
Authors
[1]
Arūnas Jagminas, State Research Institute Center of Physical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemistry A. Gostauto 9, Vilnius, Lithuania.
[2]
Aldona Jagminiene, State Research Institute Center of Physical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemistry A. Gostauto 9, Vilnius, Lithuania.
[3]
Irena Savickaja, State Research Institute Center of Physical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemistry A. Gostauto 9, Vilnius, Lithuania.
[4]
Gediminas Niaura, State Research Institute Center of Physical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemistry A. Gostauto 9, Vilnius, Lithuania.
[5]
Vitalija Jasulaitiene, State Research Institute Center of Physical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemistry A. Gostauto 9, Vilnius, Lithuania.
Abstract
We describe the influence of hydrothermal and solvothermal treatment conditions of anatase TiO2 nanotube (Ntb) films and nanoparticles (Nps) on the UV light conversion and photo-catalytic efficiency. Our results indicated that additional hydrothermal and solvothermal treatment in the ethanol-water solution resulted in the remarkable increase of photo-conversion efficiency of calcined TiO2 Ntb films. Similarly, in case of crystalline TiO2 Nps, the additional hydrothermal and solvothermal treatments are beneficial for significant enhancement of their photo-catalytic activity. X-ray diffraction, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectra as well as thermo-gravimetric plots implied that these improved performances can be mainly attributed to the binding of water molecules to the surface of TiO2 crystallites creating numerous attached OH¯ species capable of trapping the holes and reducing recombination of excited h+e- pairs.
Keywords
Photo-Conversion, Photo-Degradation, TiO2, Autoclaved Treatment, Characterization
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