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Influences of Cadmium on Nutrient Contents of Bengal Gram (Cicer arietinum L.)
Current Issue
Volume 2, 2015
Issue 3 (May)
Pages: 28-31   |   Vol. 2, No. 3, May 2015   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 31   Since Aug. 28, 2015 Views: 1763   Since Aug. 28, 2015
Authors
[1]
D. Ezhilvannan, Department of Botany, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil nadu, India.
[2]
P. S. Sharavanan, Department of Botany, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Tamil Nadu, India.
Abstract
In the pot culture experiment, Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum L.), plants were grown up to 45th days, in soil amended with various levels of cadmium (viz, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg kg-1). The inner surface of pots was lined with a polythene sheet. Each pot contained 3kg of air dried soil. Six seeds were sown in each pot. All pots were watered to field capacity daily. Plants were thinned to a maximum of two per pot, after a week of germination. Control plants were maintained separately. Cadmium at all levels (10-50 mg kg-1) tested, decreased the macro (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) and micro (copper, iron, manganese and zinc) nutrient contents of treated plants compared to untreated plants. Cadmium content of the Bengal gram plants increased with an increase of cadmium level in the soil.
Keywords
Cadmium, Toxicity, Bengal Gram and Nutrients
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