Welcome to Open Science
Contact Us
Home Books Journals Submission Open Science Join Us News Unsubscribe Page
Interrelationships and Phenotypic Correlations among Body Dimensions in Commercial Pullets Reared in the Derived Savannah Zone of Nigeria
Current Issue
Volume 2, 2014
Issue 2 (April)
Pages: 35-39   |   Vol. 2, No. 2, April 2014   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 28   Since Aug. 28, 2015 Views: 1015   Since Aug. 28, 2015
Authors
[1]
Simeon O. Olawumi , Department of Animal Production and Health Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.
Abstract
This research work was conducted to evaluate the relationship between live body weight and linear body measurements in three strains of commercial layers reared under intensive system of management. Traits considered were body weight, body length, thigh length, shank length, breast girth, while the feed variables were feed intake, feed conversion ratio and feed efficiency. There were significant (P<0.01) phenotypic correlations between body weight and linear measurements in all the three strains. Feed intake and feed efficiency also have high phenotypic correlations with body weight and linear measurements, whereas the reverse was the case with feed conversion ratio. In general, some traits had very high significant positive phenotypic correlations with body weight, some recorded medium phenotypic correlation values while some had low correlation values with body weight. Traits that recorded high phenotypic correlations with body weight are body length, thigh length, feed intake and feed efficiency, those with medium phenotypic correlations are shank length and breast girth, while trait with low phenotypic correlations was feed conversion ratio. The obtained results indicate pleiotropic effects of genes operating on these traits. The implication is that selection for any of the traits in these strains will lead to improvement of others.
Keywords
Strain, Phenotypic Correlation, Trait, Feed Efficiency, Pleiotropic, Weight
Reference
[1]
Carborg O, Kerje S, Schutz K, Jacobson L, Jensen P, Anderson L. 2003. A global search reveals epistatic interaction between QTL for early growth in the chickens. Genome Research 13: 413-421.
[2]
Chambers J.P. 1990. Genetics of growth and meat production in chickens. In: Poultry Breeding and Genetics, Crawford, R. D. (Ed.). Elsevier, New York, Tokyo. pp: 1123.
[3]
Deep N, Lamont S.J. 2002. Genetic architecture of growth and body composition in unique chicken population. Journal of Heredity 93: 107-118.
[4]
El-Labban A.F.M. 1999. Comparative studies on phenotypic performance of body measurements and carcass characteristics in males of some local strains of chickens. Egypt Poultry Science 19: 419-434.
[5]
Ezzeldin Z.A, Hanafi M.S, Khal M.M, Sabra Z.A. 1994. Phenotypic correlations between body weight and body measurements of chicken. Animal Breeding Abstract 62(6): 475.
[6]
Fitzhurgh H.A. 1976.Analysis of growth curves and strategies for altering their shapes. Journal of Animal Science 4: 1036-1040.
[7]
Ibe S.N. 1989. Measurement of size and conformation in commercial broilers. Journal Anim. Proceed. Genetic 106: 461-469.
[8]
Ige A.O, Salako A.E, Ojedapo L.O, Adedeji T.A, Yakubu A, Amao S.R, Animasahun A.O, Amao O.A. 2007. Prediction of body weight on the basis of body measurements in mature indigenous chickens in derived savannah zone of Nigeria. Proc. 32nd Annual Conference, Nigeria Society for Animal Production, 18-21 March, 2007, Calabar, Nigeria. pp185-187.
[9]
Kabir M, Yakubu H, Akpa G.N, Jokthan G.E, Abdu S.B, Abdulrashid M, Adamu H.Y. 2008. Estimates of repeatability of body weight and body conformation traits in Anak 200 strain of broiler chickens. Proceedings 13th Annual Conference, Animal Science Association of Nigeria, ABU, Zaria. pg18.
[10]
Kolawole A, Salako A.E. 2010. Phenotypic Characterization of the cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus). Proc. 35th conf., Nigeria Society for Animal Production 14-17 March, 2010, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. pp92-94
[11]
Lilja C, Sperber I, Marks H.L. 1985. Postnatal growth and organ development in Japanese quail selected for high growth rate. Growth 49: 51-69.
[12]
Nesamvuni A.E, Malandzii J, Zamanyimi N.D, Taylor G.J. 2000. Estimates of body weight in Nguru type cattle under commercial management conditions. South African Journal of Animal Science. Http: www.sasas.coza/sajar.html
[13]
Ojedapo L.O, Adedeji T.A, Ige A.O, Olayeni T.B, Ameen S.A, Ajagbe A.D. 2006. Evaluation of growth performance of three commercial layer strains in the derived savannah zone of Nigeria. Proceedings 31st Annual Conference, Nigerian Society for Animal Production, March 12th-15th , 2006 at Bayero University, Kano. pp 259-261.
[14]
Okon B, Ogar I.B, Mgbere O.O. 1997. Inter-relationships of live body measurements of broiler chickens in a humid Tropical environment. Nigerian Journal of Animal Production 24 (10): 7-12.
[15]
Ozoge M.O, Herbert U. 1997. Linear measurement of West African Dwarf (WAD) and Red Sokoto goats. Nigerian Journal Animal Production 24(1): 13-19.
[16]
Statistical Analysis System (2001). SAS Users Guide. Statistics, 8th edition, SAS Institute Cary, NC, USA.
Open Science Scholarly Journals
Open Science is a peer-reviewed platform, the journals of which cover a wide range of academic disciplines and serve the world's research and scholarly communities. Upon acceptance, Open Science Journals will be immediately and permanently free for everyone to read and download.
CONTACT US
Office Address:
228 Park Ave., S#45956, New York, NY 10003
Phone: +(001)(347)535 0661
E-mail:
LET'S GET IN TOUCH
Name
E-mail
Subject
Message
SEND MASSAGE
Copyright © 2013-, Open Science Publishers - All Rights Reserved