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A Mediated Moderator of Interpersonal Curiosity on Social Support, Social Exclusion and Social Adjustment: A University-Based Perspective
Current Issue
Volume 6, 2019
Issue 2 (March)
Pages: 9-16   |   Vol. 6, No. 2, March 2019   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 74   Since Apr. 9, 2019 Views: 1058   Since Apr. 9, 2019
Authors
[1]
Chunli Liu, Mental Health Research Center, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Faculty of Psychological Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
[2]
Changran Li, Mental Health Research Center, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Faculty of Psychological Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
[3]
Qi Jiang, Mental Health Research Center, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Faculty of Psychological Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
[4]
Lulu Hou, Mental Health Research Center, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Faculty of Psychological Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
[5]
Jingjing Ren, Mental Health Research Center, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Faculty of Psychological Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
[6]
Huanzhen Wang, Mental Health Research Center, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Faculty of Psychological Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
[7]
Xinyi Liu, Mental Health Research Center, Southwest University, Chongqing, China; Faculty of Psychological Science, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
Abstract
There are a lot of people surfed in adjustment problems in the social life. In order to explore the reasons, this research studied the relationship between social support, interpersonal curiosity, social exclusion and social adjustment. This study was aimed to explore the effect of social support and interpersonal curiosity on the relationship between social exclusion and social adjustment among Chinese undergraduates. There were 667 participants (371 female and 269 male) from 3 colleges, who completed the Social Exclusion Questionnaire for Undergraduate, Social Support Questionnaire, China College Student Adjustment Scale (CCSAS), and Interpersonal Curiosity Scale (IPCS). The result showed that the social exclusion is significant negatively related to social support and social adjustment, social support is positively related to social adjustment, and interpersonal curiosity is significantly positive related to social support and social adjustment. These findings imply that social support can mediate the negatively relationship from social exclusion to social adjustment, and interpersonal curiosity can moderate the negative relationship from social exclusion to social support. In a word, it was quite important to increase interpersonal curiosity to reduce the negative relationship from social exclusion to social support, and maintain the level of social support in order to improve the undergraduates’ social adjustment.
Keywords
Social Exclusion, Social Support, Social Adjustment, Interpersonal Curiosity
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