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Urban Farming and Its Potentials for Waste Recycling
Current Issue
Volume 2, 2014
Issue 1 (February)
Pages: 16-20   |   Vol. 2, No. 1, February 2014   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 22   Since Aug. 28, 2015 Views: 1498   Since Aug. 28, 2015
Authors
[1]
Glory E. Edet , Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, University of Uyo, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.
[2]
Nsikak-Abasi A. Etim , Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, University of Uyo, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.
Abstract
Cities in Nigeria are generating increasing volume of wastes which are usually dumped in open landfills or into water bodies. These practices pose very serious risk and threat to public health and the environment coupled with expensive amount of money involved in waste disposal. This study however examined the practice of urban farming and identified the strategies adopted by farmers in organic waste management. Through the multi-stage sampling technique, 60 urban farmers were identified and sampled with the aid of questionnaire. Data were analyzed using table and histograms. Result of the analysis revealed that urban farming was practiced on subsistence level as small holdings of farmland averaging 89.6m2 were cropped by farmers. Results also showed that urban farming was dominated by women who had intermediate education. Findings further revealed that considerable amount of wastes were generated and utilized by farmers on the farms. Results underscore the need to include urban farming in urban planning and development policies as a suitable urban greening strategy. Policies should also be formulated to provide cultivable land for urban farmers to encourage the expansion of production.
Keywords
Urban, Farming, Organic, Waste
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