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A Mini-Review on the Role of Kidney in Glucose Homeostasis in Normal and in Diabetes Mellitus
Current Issue
Volume 2, 2015
Issue 5 (October)
Pages: 68-72   |   Vol. 2, No. 5, October 2015   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 29   Since Sep. 19, 2015 Views: 1478   Since Sep. 19, 2015
Authors
[1]
Shivagovindan K. P., Department of Biochemistry, Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Melmaruvathur, TN, India.
[2]
Saleem B., Department of Biochemistry, Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Melmaruvathur, TN, India.
[3]
Sathish Kumar M., Department of Physiology, Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Melmaruvathur, TN, India.
[4]
Manopriya T., Department of Physiology, Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Melmaruvathur, TN, India.
[5]
Sheriff D. S., Department of Biochemistry, Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Melmaruvathur, TN, India.
[6]
Omer Sheriff S., Faculty of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Abstract
It is proven today that kidney both utilizes, forms and releases glucose in the post absorptive state. Therefore, role of kidney assumes greater significance in overall glucose metabolism in the fedand starve state. The studies elucidating the role of kidney in blood glucose homeostasis is opened up new avenues of looking for drugs to control blood glucose level in Diabetes. 1-2 The kidney acts as a dual organ with respect to glucose metabolism-renal medulla is mainly involved in glucose utilization and the cortex for glucose formation and release. Renal medulla is rich in enzymes phosphorylating glucose and glycolytic enzymes. Therefore renal medulla is obligate user of glucose like the brain cells. Renal cortex has glucose 6 phosphatase activity and gluconeogenic enzymes for glucose formation and release. 2-4 The role of kidney in Blood glucose homeostasis both in fed and starve conditions have been areas of recent focus of research and study. These studies have paved way to look for newer forms of drugs to treat diabetes. Therefore, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of diabetic medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
Keywords
Kidney, Gluconeogenesis, Sodium-Glucose co Transporter (SGLT), Renal Medulla, Renal Cortex
Reference
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