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Knowledge, Attitude and Practices Regarding Genital Tract Infections Among Female Undergraduate Students, Ibadan, Nigeria
Current Issue
Volume 6, 2018
Issue 4 (December)
Pages: 114-121   |   Vol. 6, No. 4, December 2018   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 9   Since Jan. 17, 2019 Views: 113   Since Jan. 17, 2019
Authors
[1]
Aroniyiaso Oladipupo Tosin, Department of Guidance and Counseling, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
[2]
Ajayi Ifeoluwa Esther, Department of Guidance and Counseling, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
Abstract
Various researchers have put in place interventions in different sectors and categories of communities to curb the spread of health related issues associated with genital tract infections. Interventions which include: voluntary testing and counseling, treatment, care and supports, among others to mitigate its impact, which ranges from less serious to fatal outcomes such as neurological and cardiovascular diseases, pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and ano-genital cancers specifically cervical cancer. This attracted the attention of this study to assess University of Ibadan female undergraduate’s knowledge, attitude and practices regarding genital tract infections. Survey research design was adopted and Questionnaires were used to gather data from female undergraduate students of university of Ibadan, Nigeria. Purposive sampling technique was used to select two hundred female undergraduate students who participated in the study. Data collected was analyzed using version 20.0 of statistical package for social sciences. The result revealed inadequate knowledge of genital tract infection among female undergraduate students of university of Ibadan. It was also discovered that there is adequate and positive attitude toward genital tract infections/ vaginal infection among the female students. Further analysis revealed that prevalence rate of genital tract infections/ vaginal infection among selected female undergraduate students of university of Ibadan is high (90%). Also, the findings revealed that there was a significant relationship between student’s knowledge and preventive measures against vaginal infections among female undergraduate students of university of Ibadan at (r =.169* df = 200, P<.05). The study concluded with discussion of findings and recommended that health professionals in the university health setting should or should be organizing educative programme on yearly bases to educate the female undergraduate students on practical ways and methods of living healthy without vaginal infection because the finding of the study revealed that female undergraduate students of the university of Ibadan had inadequate knowledge and the prevalence rate of the vaginal infection is high.
Keywords
Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, Vaginal, Infections
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