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Community Acquired Acute Kidney Injury Among Children at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto
Current Issue
Volume 8, 2020
Issue 1 (March)
Pages: 1-6   |   Vol. 8, No. 1, March 2020   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 8   Since Jun. 8, 2020 Views: 331   Since Jun. 8, 2020
Authors
[1]
Jiya Fatima Bello, Department of Paediatrics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.
[2]
Ibitoye Paul Kehinde, Department of Paediatrics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.
[3]
Jiya Nma Muhammed, Department of Paediatrics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.
[4]
Jibrin Baba, Department of Paediatrics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.
[5]
Adamu Asma’u, Department of Paediatrics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.
[6]
Isezuo Khadijat Omeneke, Department of Paediatrics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.
[7]
Obasi Izuchukwu, Department of Paediatrics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria.
Abstract
Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality particularly in developing countries. Community acquired forms are more prevalent in our setting, due perhaps to high occurrence of infectious diseases of relevance to the development of AKI. The Objectives of the study were: To determine the prevalence, pattern and outcome of AKI among children at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital (UDUTH) Sokoto. This was a 2- year retrospective descriptive study from September 2015 to August 2017. Cases were children aged 2 months to 14 years admitted into Emergency Paediatric Unit (EPU) of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital (UDUTH) Sokoto, with diagnosis of AKI using kidney disease improving global outcome criteria. Relevant information from their case folders were extracted into a profoma sheet and data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: Thirty six of the 3493 admissions had diagnosis of AKI, giving a prevalence of 10.3 AKI cases per 1000 children. Males were 22 (61.1%) and females were 14 (38.9%), with M:F ratio 1.5:1. Mean age at presentation was 2.47 ± 1.4 years. Majority 20 (55.6%) were of low socioeconomic class. The common presenting symptoms were reduced or non-passage of urine in 23 (63.9%) of the patients, body swelling 22 (61.1%), and fever 14 (38.9%). Acute glomerulonephritis 10 (27.7%), Obstructive uropathy 7 (19.4%) and Septicaemia 6 (16.6%) were the commonest aetiologic diagnosis. Majority 21 (58.3%) of them had AKI stage 3. Three (50.0%) of the six patients with indication for dialysis underwent peritoneal dialysis. Twenty six (72.2%) of the 36 patients were discharged, 6 (16.7%) died and 4 (11.1%) left against medical advice. Of the 26 that were discharged, 14 (53.8%) were lost to follow up at 3 months. Conclusion and Recommendation: Acute glomerulonephritis is the commonest cause of AKI seen in this study. Majority were discharged but a significant number of them were lost to follow up. Preventive strategies at all levels of care still remains paramount.
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury, Children, Presentation, Sokoto, Outcome
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