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Association of Maternal Fish Consumption with Mercury Levels of New Born Infants in a Tertiary Medical Centre in a Middle Income Country
Current Issue
Volume 7, 2019
Issue 1 (March)
Pages: 20-24   |   Vol. 7, No. 1, March 2019   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 29   Since May 15, 2019 Views: 501   Since May 15, 2019
Authors
[1]
Foong Ming Moy, Centre of Epidemiology & Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[2]
Nuguelis Razali, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[3]
Victor Chee Wai Hoe, Centre of Epidemiology & Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health-UM, Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[4]
Golgis Karimi, Centre of Epidemiology & Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[5]
Siti Zawiah Omar, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the levels of total (T-Hg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) in new born infants and its association with maternal characteristics and fish consumption. A total of 75 Malay women were recruited from a tertiary medical centre in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Fish consumption was enquired on the types of fish and frequency consumed. Cord and maternal blood was collected and analyzed for T-Hg and MeHg. More than half (.54%) of the participants consumed fish weekly, 22% monthly and 19% daily. Kembong (Mackerel) (71%), canned fish (24%) and Kerisi (Bream) (20%) were the three most common fish consumed. Both T-Hg and MeHg levels were significantly higher in infant’s cord blood (p < 0.05). However, the levels of T-Hg and MeHg among infants were within the safe recommended limits. There was a positive correlation between maternal and cord blood in the T-Hg (r= 0.73, p < 0.01) and MeHg (r= 0.63, p < 0.01) levels. In the multiple linear regression model, infant mercury level was strongly associated with maternal mercury level; while no significant association was noted between infant mercury level with maternal age and fish consumption. Regular monitoring of the levels of mercury in commonly consumed fish and pregnant women’s exposure to mercury should be part of public health surveillance.
Keywords
Total Mercury, Methyl Mercury, Fish Consumption, Pregnancy, Infant
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