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Preliminary Study of Seismic Hazard Along the Cameroon Volcanic Line
Current Issue
Volume 8, 2021
Issue 1 (March)
Pages: 1-10   |   Vol. 8, No. 1, March 2021   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 51   Since Mar. 29, 2021 Views: 672   Since Mar. 29, 2021
Authors
[1]
Vanessa Gaelle Nana, Branch for Geophysical and Volcanological Research, Institute for Geological and Mining Research, Buea, Cameroon; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
[2]
Sterve Alain Lepatio Tchieg, National Institute of Cartography, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
[3]
Edouard Olivier Ntomb Biboum, Branch for Geophysical and Volcanological Research, Institute for Geological and Mining Research, Buea, Cameroon; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
[4]
Estelle Eric M. Fosso Teguia, Branch for Geophysical and Volcanological Research, Institute for Geological and Mining Research, Buea, Cameroon; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon.
[5]
Severin Nguiya, National Advanced School of Engineering of Douala, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon.
[6]
Alain Pierre Tokam Kamga, National Advanced School of Engineering of Douala, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon.
Abstract
Earthquakes frequently occur along the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL), with magnitudes ranging between two and six. These events are from tectonics and volcanic origins. An experiment called Cameroon Broadband Seismic Experiment (CBSE) was conducted in the country between 2005 and 2007. These data collected was used in this work to compute seismic hazards and therefore highlight the most risk prone areas around the CVL. We focused our analysis on one year’s period going from January to December 2005. On these data, we applied a pass band filter with frequency ranging from one to five Hz, then we did the picking of the P and S first arrivals; this allows to locate earthquakes. The located events were distributed along the Congo Craton margin. This gives an updated view of the Cameroon neoseismicity. From the seismicity map and seismic hazard computation, we distinguished four risky areas: The mount Cameroon area, considered like the most seismically active; then the southern Cameroon area whose seismicity is associated to the Kribi-Campo fault and also the presence of Congo Craton known for its high magnitude tectonic activity; the area along the Sanaga fault is the third risk zone; and the last one is the western Cameroon area characterized by a large fault network.
Keywords
Seismic Hazard, Seismicity, First Arrivals, Fault
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