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Regeneration of Potato Plantlets Through Shoot Tip Culture Comparison Between GA3 and BAP
Current Issue
Volume 5, 2017
Issue 3 (June)
Pages: 13-20   |   Vol. 5, No. 3, June 2017   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 124   Since Jun. 28, 2017 Views: 643   Since Jun. 28, 2017
Authors
[1]
Akhtar Hussain Shar, Faculty of Crop Production, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan; College of Life Science, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, China.
[2]
Muharam Ali Qambrani, Faculty of Crop Production, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan.
[3]
Piar Ali Shar, Faculty of Crop Production, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan; College of Natural Resources & Environment, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, China.
[4]
Shabana Memon, Faculty of Crop Production, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan.
[5]
Abdul Ghaffar Shar, Faculty of Crop Production, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan.
[6]
Jingjing Liu, College of Life Science, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, China; College of Life Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, China.
[7]
Fengxia Shen, College of Life Science, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, China; College of Life Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, China.
[8]
Shahmir Ali Kalhoro, Institute of Soil and Conservation Northwest A & F University, Yangling, China.
[9]
Shah Nawaz Marri, Faculty of Crop Production, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan.
[10]
Mohamed Shahen, College of Life Science, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, China; Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.
Abstract
The research was conducted to investigate on the regeneration of potato plantlets through shoot tip culture, were carried out in the Virology Laboratory of Plant Pathology Section. Agriculture Research Institute, Tandojam during 2012. The regeneration of potato plantlets was compared between media based on various BAP and GA3 concentrations. The results revealed significant (P<0.05) effect of Murshigue & Skoog (M S) media and their concentrations on root/shoot number, root/shoot length, leaves plant-1 and callus formation. It was also observed that GA3 based media at 2.00mg liter-1 concentration to produce roots plant-1 34.65, shoots plant-1 11.48, cm root length 4.13, cm shoot length 5.56, leaves plant-1 6.37 and percent callus formation 83.12; while the values for these characters under rest of the GA3 concentrations (2.50, 1.50 and 1.00 mg liter-1 were significantly lower than this optimum GA3 concentration. In BAP based media, 4.00 mg liter-1 concentration showed better results with 24.38 roots plant-1, 7.07 shoots plant-1, 3.44 cm root length, 4.29 cm shoot length, 5.29 leaves plant-1 and 66.63 percent callus formation; and values for these traits for other BAP concentrations were significantly lower. On an overall average, the BAP and GA3 based media resulted in 21.20 and 28.70 roots plant-1, 5.60 and 8.72 shoots plant-1, 2.58 and 2.92 cm root length, 2.93 and 3.86 cm shoot length, 3.94 and 4.83 leaves plant-1 and 54.87 and 67.60 percent callus formation. In conclusion, results clearly indicate that GA3 was more effective to produce higher values for all the traits examined for regeneration of plantlets through shoot tip culture.
Keywords
Regeneration, Potato Plantlets, Nitrogen, Shoot Tip Culture, BAP, and GA3
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