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Forensic Entomology: Decomposing Pig Carrion and Its Associating Insect Fauna in Okija, Anambra State, Nigeria
Current Issue
Volume 4, 2016
Issue 2 (April)
Pages: 6-11   |   Vol. 4, No. 2, April 2016   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 58   Since Mar. 22, 2016 Views: 1278   Since Mar. 22, 2016
Authors
[1]
Abajue Maduamaka C., Department of Zoology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
[2]
Ewuim Sylvanus C., Department of Zoology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
Abstract
Studies were conducted to ascertain the insects composition associated with decomposing pig carrions Susscrofa Linn., as models. The experiments were carried out in a fallow plot of land in Okija town of Anambra State, Nigeria. Both the adult insects and their larvae were collected at various decomposition stages of the carrions. Samples of the collected larvae were reared to adult stage in the laboratory. The adult insects were identified to species level. The species that are useful inforensic science include the Chrysomya albiceps Weid (Diptera: Calliphoridae), C. chloropyga Weid (Diptera; Calliphoridae), C. regalis Rob-Desv (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Isomyia dubiosa Villen (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Isomyia sp., Sarcophaga inzi Curran (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), Chrysomyza africana Hendel (Diptera: Ulidiidae), Musca domestica Linn. (Diptera: Muscidae), Hermatiaillucens Linn. (Diptera: Stratiomyiidae), Dermestes frischii Kug (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), Necrobia rufipes Deg (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and Necrobia ruficolis Fab. (Coleoptera: Cleridae). The Usefulness of the insects in estimating minimum postmortem interval (mPMI) of carrions in relation to forensic science was discussed.
Keywords
Forensic Entomology, Insects, Carrions, Decomposition Stages, Okija
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